The Latest

Untitled Pattern º2
Jul 31, 2014

Untitled Pattern º2

Untitled Pattern º1
Jul 31, 2014

Untitled Pattern º1


Somewhere in Algeria
Jul 29, 2014 / 2,190 notes

Somewhere in Algeria

(via nativefunkk)

lucesolare:

Oluchi Onweagba by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia August 1998
Jul 29, 2014 / 1,177 notes

lucesolare:

Oluchi Onweagba by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia August 1998

(via amaziiigh)

Jul 29, 2014 / 2,510 notes

(via amaziiigh)

Jul 29, 2014 / 159 notes

(via amaziiigh)

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Ferencz-Franz Eisenhut (1857-1903) - The Armourer, oil on canvas, 71 x 57 cm.
Jul 29, 2014 / 171 notes

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Ferencz-Franz Eisenhut (1857-1903) - The Armourer, oil on canvas, 71 x 57 cm.

(via amaziiigh)

kayeljack:

Best fish in town. #traveldiaries #sudan #الكيلو #portsudan
Jul 29, 2014 / 4 notes

kayeljack:

Best fish in town. #traveldiaries #sudan #الكيلو #portsudan

2turtlestumbling:

a—fri—ca:

Soninke Women of Mauritania Painting Their Hut
(Photo from Mauritania)
The Soninke (also called Sarakole, Seraculeh, or Serahuli) are a Mandé people who descend from the Bafour and are closely related to the Imraguen of Mauritania.
They speak the Soninke language, a Mande language. They were the founders of the ancient empire of Ghana c. 750-1240 CE.
Subgroups of Soninke include the Maraka and Wangara. After contact with Muslim Almoravid traders from the north around 1066, Soninke nobles of neighboring Takrur were among the first ethnic groups from Sub-Saharan West Africa to embrace Islam.
When the Ghana empire dispersed, the resulting diaspora brought Soninkes to Mali, Senegal, Mauritania, Gambia, and Guinea-Bissau.
This diaspora included Wangara, famous traders who spread far from traditionally Mande areas. Hence the term Wangara is used today in Ghana and Burkina Faso to describe the Soninke populations in cities and towns.
Today, Soninke around 1 million.
(Wikipedia)
Jul 28, 2014 / 158 notes

2turtlestumbling:

a—fri—ca:

Soninke Women of Mauritania Painting Their Hut

(Photo from Mauritania)

The Soninke (also called Sarakole, Seraculeh, or Serahuli) are a Mandé people who descend from the Bafour and are closely related to the Imraguen of Mauritania.

They speak the Soninke language, a Mande language. They were the founders of the ancient empire of Ghana c. 750-1240 CE.

Subgroups of Soninke include the Maraka and Wangara. After contact with Muslim Almoravid traders from the north around 1066, Soninke nobles of neighboring Takrur were among the first ethnic groups from Sub-Saharan West Africa to embrace Islam.

When the Ghana empire dispersed, the resulting diaspora brought Soninkes to Mali, Senegal, Mauritania, Gambia, and Guinea-Bissau.

This diaspora included Wangara, famous traders who spread far from traditionally Mande areas. Hence the term Wangara is used today in Ghana and Burkina Faso to describe the Soninke populations in cities and towns.

Today, Soninke around 1 million.

(Wikipedia)

(via nativefunkk)

Jul 28, 2014 / 521 notes

(via 5alageen)